Do's and Dont's

Here we have provided some basic "Doís and DonítsĒ to help you make the right decisions should you ever be injured because of an accident or the carelessness of others.

Should you ever suffer such an injury, we urge you to contact The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation as soon as possible. You deserve to be compensated for your pain, suffering and monetary losses Ė and with our record of winning, we give you a great chance of getting the settlement you deserve.

To view the "Doís and DonítsĒ for any of our specialized areas of legal expertise, simply click on the appropriate category below.


Personal Injury

Automobile/Motorcycle/Trucking Accidents

Offshore/Maritime Accidents

Workers Compensation Accidents

Industrial/Chemical/Explosive Accidents

Medical Malpractice


Personal Injury


If you are ever injured because of an accident, carelessness of another or through the fault of a product malfunction, you deserve to be compensated for your pain, suffering, loss of wages and possibly even more. Itís important to not only know your rights but to also know what to do and not to do at the time the injury occurs Ė as well as before, during and after medical aid is administered.

Thatís why we have provided the following list of Doís and Doníts to help you make sound decisions in case you are ever injured. And remember, if you are injured you can always rely on The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation Ė where a fair settlement is no accident.

DOís: What To Do In Case Of Personal Injury:

1. Seek legal advice as soon as you or a family member become the victim of negligence by a third party.

2. Learn your rights and how the law protects you in the circumstance of your injury.

3. Identify witnesses to the accident (names, addresses and phone numbers).

4. When possible, photograph or videotape the surroundings, instrumentalities or things that caused or played a role in causing the accident.

5. Where appropriate, call the police or governmental authorities to investigate, and:
-Never be talked out of calling the authorities, because without a police, incident or investigative report, you may not be able to prove your case.
-Give the police or authorities your full cooperation and a full, accurate account of what happened. Never admit fault and never exaggerate!
-List for police or the authorities all symptoms of injury you may be feeling, no matter how slight.
-Try to listen to what the other persons involved in any way in the accident or incident tells police or the authorities about what happened.
-Ask the police or authorities about fault under law or regulations which apply to the accident or incident.
-Cooperate fully and completely with any request made by the authorities, and always be courteous.

6. If in pain, report your condition to any and all authorities involved in the investigation and request an ambulance.

7. When the medics arrive, give them a full, accurate report of symptoms.
-Cooperate fully with their examination and treatment plan.

8. Never attempt to drive, operate heavy machinery or work at heights if you are dazed, injured or on strong medications.

9. Call a family member or friend to the scene of the accident or incident, to lend assistance and as a witness.
-If possible, ask them to bring a photo-camera or video-camera to record the scene.

10. Attempt to get names, phone numbers and addresses of any witnesses.
-Give this information to the investigating officer or governmental authority. Keep a copy.

11. If symptoms last several hours, go to your family doctor or emergency room.
-Report how the accident occurred and give a full, accurate account of symptoms, but never exaggerate.
-Submit as necessary to exams, x-rays and advice of the treating doctor.
If recommended, or if symptoms continue, see a specialist.
-Follow your doctorís recommendations (to the letter).
-Donít be afraid to ask questions of your doctor, to help you understand your injuries and treatment.

12. Donít discuss your case with any unnecessary parties.
-Your spouse, your doctor and your insurance agent are necessary. You should tell your insurance agent only what is absolutely necessary to give him/her notice of the accident and injury.
-Insurance adjusters who want recorded statements are not necessary and you should never give such a statement.

13. Report the accident to your insurance company.
-Get a copy of the accident report for them, and check it for accuracy.
-If the report is inaccurate, call the investigating officer or governmental authority and question him on it. (You have a right to do this. Ask him to correct the report.)
-If you have applicable insurance coverage, insist that your company investigate the accident/injury, and appraise and/or repair any damage done to your property.
(They will be reimbursed by the other, responsible partyís insurance.)

14. If your injuries/symptoms persist for more than a few days, consult an attorney.
-Be sure the attorney is a personal injury specialist. Ask him about his experience!
-Write down all questions you may have about the accident prior to the interview.
-Learn all you can about your rights in such a legal case.
-Ask what fees and expenses you will be required to pay, what the attorney thinks the case should be valued at, and what he feels he can do for you in a recovery.
-Donít hesitate to interview several attorneys and compare their responses.

15. Get property damage estimates on any damaged equipment or property from the accident, if you have appropriate coverage to repair such damages. Give these estimates to your attorney or to the negligent partyís insurance company if you have no attorney.
-Try to get the identity of the responsible partyís insurance carrier and ask them to repair your damaged property.

16. Try to get the responsible partyís insurer to pay for your medical bills, without signing releases. (By doing so, the other driverís insurance company will be admitting fault.)

17. Never sign any releases until you are fully prepared to settle your case.
-The only exception is when your attorney advises you to do so, for a particular and important reason.

18. Keep a written daily diary of the aftermath of the accident.
-List all that happened in the accident and initial medical exams.
-Follow your progress and the problems caused in everyday life by your injuries.
(This will prove invaluable at your trial, which may be much later.)

19. You should never consider settling your case until all your symptoms have disappeared and you are back to normal.
-If you have had a concussion, you should not settle for six (6) months, at least.
-Remember: Your cause of action is the most important protection you have against a truly serious or catastrophic injury.

20. Obtain the following documentation for yourself and/or your attorney:
-Copies of all medical bills resulting from the accident.
-A list of which bills have been paid and which have not.
-A list of mileages to and from all healthcare providers.
-Copies of all doctorís medical reports and dictations in your medical file.
-Copies of all admit and emergency room records of all hospitals treating you for the accident.
-Copies of radiology reports on tests given to you, such as x-rays, CT scans, MRIs or myelograms.
-Copies of all statements given by any witnesses to any aspect of the accident.
-Copies of your wage records or income tax returns to show the impact of the accident on your income.
-Any photographs or videotape of the injuries, accident scene, vehicles, equipment, property or any other aspect of the case.
-Copies of your insurance policies.
-Copies of property damage estimates on your vehicle.
-A copy of the accident report filed by the police or governmental authorities.

DON'Ts: What Not To Do In Case Of Personal Injury:

1. Donít be talked into not calling the police or governmental authorities.

2. Donít give recorded statements to insurance adjusters.

3. Donít sign releases or checks with release language printed on them.

4. Donít settle your case unless your symptoms are completely gone.

5. Donít settle your case unless you have spoken to an attorney and have had your rights explained to you and your questions answered.

6. Donít discuss any aspects of your case with unnecessary persons.

7. Donít do anything just because they say you "have toĒ.


Automobile/Motorcycle/Trucking Accidents


If you are involved in an auto accident it is very important to avoid getting carried away or emotional Ė especially if there are injuries. Try to remain composed, alert and in control of your actions. The following list of Doís and Doníts will help you make sound decisions in case you are ever involved in a car accident. And remember, if you are injured you can always rely on The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation Ė where a fair settlement is no accident.

DOís: What To Do When An Automobile Accident Happens:

1.After impact, new laws may require that you move your vehicle, but only do so if you are without pain and apparent injury. If you are in pain, stunned or dazed, don't attempt to move, remain in place until help arrives. Moving your vehicle is only required on busy thoroughfares at peak traffic hours, and only if you can do so without further injury or aggravation of symptoms.

2. Take Photos, then Move. If you are without pain or apparent injury, exit your vehicle and utilizing a disposable camera that you should carry in your car at all times, document the accident quickly and completely.
 
3.Take pictures of your vehicle, the other vehicle/vehicles, any and all damage, the other vehicle(s) license plate, the driver of the other vehicle(s), the area, the road conditions and the sky.
 
4. Have the photos processed and two copies of all photos made, one for you and one for your attorney. Do not give copies to anyone, unless approved by your attorney.

5. Call the police immediately.
-Never be talked out of calling the authorities, because without a police report, you will not be able to prove your case.
-Give the policeman a full, accurate account of what happened. Never admit fault and never exaggerate!
-List for him all symptoms of injury you may be feeling, no matter how slight.
-Try to listen to what the other driver tells the officer and how he responds.
-Ask the officer who will get a citation and for what.
-Cooperate fully and completely with any request made by the authorities, and always be courteous.

6. If in pain, report your condition to the officer and request an ambulance.

7. When the medics arrive, give them a full, accurate report of symptoms.
-Cooperate with their examination and treatment plan.

8. Never attempt todrive if dazed or injured.

9. Call a family member or friend to the scene, to lend assistance and as a witness.
-If possible, ask them to bring a camera to photograph the cars and scenes.

10. Attempt to getnames, phone numbers and addresses of any eyewitnesses.
-Give this information to the investigating officer; keep a copy.

11. If symptoms lastseveral hours, go to your family doctor or emergency room.
-Report how the accident occurred and give a full, accurate account of the symptoms, but never exaggerate.
-Submit as necessary to exams, x-rays and advice of the treating doctor.
-If recommended, or if symptoms continue, see a specialist.
-Follow your doctor's recommendations "to the letter".
-Don't be afraid to ask questions of your doctor, to help you understand your injuries and treatment.

12. Don't discussyour case with any unnecessary parties.
-Your spouse, your doctor and your insurance agent are necessary.
-Insurance adjusters who want recorded statements are not necessary and you should never give such a statement.

13. Report the accident to your insurance company. -Get a copy of the accident report for them, and check it for accuracy.
-If the report is inaccurate, call the investigating officer and question him on it.
(You have the right to do this. Ask him to correct the report.)
-If you have collision coverage, insist that your company appraise and repair your vehicle immediately.
(They'll be reimbursed by the other driver's insurance.)

14. If your injuries/symptoms persist for more than a few days,consult an attorney.
-Be sure the attorney is a personal injury specialist. Ask him about his experience!
-Write down all questions you may have about the accident prior to the interview.
-Learn all you can about your rights in such a legal case.
-Ask what fees and expenses you will be required to pay, what the attorney thinks the case should be valued at and what he feels he can do for you in recovery.
-Don't hesitate to interview several attorneys and compare their responses.

15. Get two (2) property damage estimates if you have no collision coverage, and give these to your attorney or to the other driver's insurance company if you have no attorney.
-Try to get the other driver's insurer to repair your vehicle without signing any releases.

16. Try to get the other driver's insurer to pay for your medical bills, without signing releases.
(By doing so, the other driver's insurance company will be admitting fault.)

17. Never sign any releases until you are fully prepared to settle your case.
-The only exception is when your attorney advises you to do so.

18. Keep a written daily diary of the aftermath of the accident.
-List all that happened in the accident and initial medical exams.
-Follow your progress and the problems caused in everyday life by your injuries.
(This will prove invaluable at your trial, which may be much later.)

19. You should never consider settling your case until all your symptoms have disappeared and you are back to normal.
-If you have had a concussion, you should not settle for six (6) months, at least.
-Remember: Your cause of action is the most important protection you have against a truly serious or catastrophic injury.

20. Obtain the following documentation for yourself and/or your attorney:
-Copies of all medical bills resulting from the accident.
-A list of which bills have been paid and which have not.
-A list of mileage to and from all health care providers.
-Copies of all doctors' medical reports and dictations in your medical file.
-Copies of all admit and emergency room records of all hospitals treating you for the accident.
-Copies of radiology reports on tests given to you, such as x-rays, CT Scans, MRI's or Myelograms.
-Copies of all statements given by any witness to any aspect of the accident.
-Copies of your wage records or income tax returns to show the impact of the accident on your income.
-Any photograph or videotape of the injuries, accident scene, vehicles or any other aspect of the case.
-Copies of your insurance policies.
-Copies of your property damage estimates on your vehicle.
-Copy of the accident report filed by the police.

DON'Ts: What Not To Do When An Automobile Accident Happens:

1. Don't be talked into not calling the police.

2. Don't give recorded statements to insurance adjusters.

3. Don't sign releases or checks with release language printed on them.

4. Don't settle your case unless your symptoms are completely gone.

5. Don't settle your case unless you have spoken to an attorney and have had your rights explained to you and your questions answered.

6. Don't discuss any aspects of your case with unnecessary persons.

7. Don't do anything just because they say you "have to".


Offshore/Maritime Accidents


Accidents and injuries due to activities that take place in open waters are especially unique to our community. No other law firm in the area can match our level of day-to-day, hands-on experience in dealing with the complex laws and specialized circumstances surrounding these cases.

The following list of Doís and Doníts will help you make sound decisions in case you are ever involved in a maritime or offshore accident. And remember, if you are injured you can always rely on The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation Ė where a fair settlement is no accident.

DOís:
What To Do In Case Of An Offshore Or Maritime Accident:

1. Report the accident, including how and why it happened, who and what was involved and your injuries.
-Call for help and assistance. Insist on immediate medical care if the injury causes substantial pain or appears serious.

-Be careful not to try to shield the people or equipment who caused or contributed to the accident or to minimize your injuries.

-List all your injuries and problems to the supervisor, so they can be placed in the accident report.

-Be sure an accident report is filled out and you are given a copy.

2. Attempt to get names, phone numbers and the addresses of witnesses who were present or who know about the cause of the accident.

3. Get the necessary medical attention. Do not just hope the problems will just pass in a few days or weeks. If your injuries worsen or linger, see a doctor as soon as possible even if you have to pay for it yourself.
-Avoid being referred to a "Company Doctor" if possible, and try to go to a doctor of your own choice who is familiar with you.
-If you have a head or spinal injury, see an orthopedic or neurological specialist.
-Determine as early as possible if you will have to miss work and for how long.
-Determine also what the "long-term prognosis" will be in terms of surgery or disability.

4. Limit your discussions of the case to necessary parties, such as members of your family or those providing medical treatment.

5. If your injuries persist for more than a few days, consult an attorney who is a specialist in maritime or offshore accidents.
-Ask him about his experience.
-Handwrite a detailed version of the accident, injuries, treatment and disability to take with you for the first meeting. Write down as many questions as you can think of on law and procedure in your injury case.
-Ask about fees and expenses of the case.
-Ask your family and friends if they know the attorney or his firm and what they think of him.
-Don't hesitate to interview several attorneys or to ask what they feel they can do to help you.

6. Obtain the following documents for yourself or your attorney:
-Copies of all medical reports and bills.
-Copies of your wage records and income tax returns.
-Copies of any accident reports or statements given by you.

7. Read any documents presented to you before you sign them. If you have any doubts about this, you should see an attorney.

8. Other documentation that can be very important and that you should try to obtain, where possible, include:
-List of mileage to and from all health care visits (which can be reimbursed to you at a later time).
-Copies of any radiology reports on tests given to you, such as x-rays, CT Scans, Bone Scan, MRI or Myelogram.
-Any log books you may have kept on your work offshore, showing time spent there and activities.
-Names and addresses of co-employees who were working with you at the scene of the accident, whether for the same or a different company, who could be witnesses to this or other similar accidents.

DON'Ts:
What Not To Do In Case Of An Offshore Or Maritime Accident:

1. Don't be talked into not reporting the accident, even to preserve "safety records" of some company.

2. Don't sign releases or checks with release language printed on them.

3. Don't settle your case until you are satisfied you have recovered or reached maximum medical improvement.

4. Don't settle your case unless you have consulted an attorney. He may be able to answer your questions or fully explain your rights to you initially, even though your version of the accident and injuries may not be complete.

5. Don't do anything just because your employer or someone else says you "have to".


Workplace/Workers Compensation Accidents


If you are ever injured while performing work-related activities, a different set of legal criteria, rules and laws apply than in other personal injury situations. These are generally in accordance with Workersí Compensation guidelines, which are constantly being re-regulated and changed. While you may think you know the rules regarding workersí compensation, itís highly likely that everything you know has already changed.

Itís part of our job to stay on top of all these changes so that we can protect your rights and win your case. Thatís why we have provided the following list of Doís and Doníts to help you make sound decisions in case you are ever injured on the job. And remember, if you are injured you can always rely on The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation Ė where a fair settlement is no accident.

DOís:
What To Do In Case Of A Workplace or Workersí Compensation Accident:

1. Immediately after the accident, do not try to move if you are hurt.
-Call for help to get up and for assistance. Insist on an ambulance and immediate medical care if the injury causes substantial pain or appears serious.

2. Identify witnesses to the accident (names, addresses and phone numbers).

3. Report the accident as soon as possible to your supervisor.
-Be sure an accident report is filled out and you get a copy.
-List all your injuries and problems to your supervisor, so they can be placed in the accident report.

4. Seek medical assistance immediately if pain persists, or is serious. (Workers' Compensation benefits include payment of all medical costs resulting from the injury.)
-Avoid being referred to a "Company Doctor" if possible, and try to go to a doctor of your own choice who is familiar with you.
-If you have a head or spinal injury, see an orthopedic or neurological specialist.
-Determine as early as possible if you will have to miss work and for how long.
-Determine what the "long-term prognosis" will be in terms of surgery or disability.

5. Obtain all available information on your employer's workers' compensation insurer.
-Contact them as early as possible, to start benefits if you will be out of work for more than one week.

6. If you are unable to work after seven (7) days, request (in writing) that workers' compensation benefits be started as of the eighth day.

7. File a Claim Form LDOL-WC-1008 "Claim for Compensation" on the eighth day after the accident, if benefits have not begun.
-Send copies of all medical bills, accident reports, medical reports or other documents you may have on the accident with your Form 1008, to Office of Workers' Compensation Administration, P.O. Box 94040, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70804-9040.
-If you have questions on how to fill out the forms, or anything else, you may call: 1-225-342-7555; or Toll Free: 1-800-824-4592.

8. If the compensation insurance will not begin making payments on your medical bills and weekly benefits of two-thirds (2/3) of your gross weekly wage, you should consult an attorney immediately.
-Be sure the attorney is a personal injury specialist. Ask him about his experience!
-Write down all questions you may have about your work accident and compensation laws prior to interview.
-Learn all you can about your rights under workers' compensation laws.
-Ask what fees and expenses you will be required to pay.
-Ask what the attorney feels he can do to help you and how he evaluates your chances.
-Don't hesitate to interview several attorneys and compare their responses.

9. Obtain the following documentation for your own file:
-Copies of all medical bills caused by the accident, paid and unpaid.
-A list of which bills have been paid and which have not been paid.
-List of mileage to and from all health care visits (to be reimbursed to you at 21Ę per mile).
-Copies of all doctors' narrative reports from treating physicians.
-Copies of all admit and emergency room charts at all hospitals which have treated you.
-Copies of all radiology reports on tests given to you, such as x-rays, CT Scans, Bone Scan, MRI or Myelogram.
-Copies of any statements given by you to your employer or the insurance company.
-Copies of any witness statements obtained from anyone on how the accident occurred.
-Copies of your wage records (or check stubs) from the last four (4) full weeks you worked prior to the accident.
-Copies of any correspondence between the insurance company and the Workers' Compensation Commission.
-An explanation from the insurance company on how it arrived at your workers' compensation rate and what it believes to be your average weekly gross wage.

10. Be sure you are being paid two-thirds (2/3) of your average weekly wage before any deduction (gross wage).

11. Never sign any releases until you are fully prepared to settle your case.
-If you do so, your medical condition should have completely stabilized and you should have reached maximum medical improvement.

12. Keep a written daily diary of the aftermath of the accident.
-List all that happened in the accident and initial medical examinations.
-Follow your progress and the problems caused in everyday life by your injuries.
(This will prove invaluable at your trial, which may be much later.)

13. Don't discuss your case with any unnecessary parties.
-Your spouse, your doctor and your attorney are the only necessary parties.
Insurance adjusters or anyone else who want a recorded statement are not necessary and you should not give such a statement to anyone.

DON'Ts:
What Not To Do In Case Of A Workplace or Workers' Compensation Accident:

1. Donít be talked into not reporting the accident (not even to preserve "safety records").

2. Donít give recorded statements to unnecessary parties.

3. Donít sign releases or checks with release language printed on them.

4. Donít settle your case unless you have medically stabilized.

5. Donít settle your case unless you have spoken to an attorney and have had your questions answered and your rights explained to you.

6. Donít discuss any aspects of your case with unnecessary persons.

7. Donít do anything just because they say you "have toĒ.


Industrial/Chemical/Explosive Accidents


If you or a member of your family are ever involved in an industrial or chemical accident, it is important that you NOT sign anything and contact us as soon as possible. These types of cases can be very complicated and usually result in the corporation and their insurance companies "circling the wagonsĒ in their own defense. You could easily become intimidated or overwhelmed by these circumstances. However, the following list of Doís and Doníts will help you make sound decisions should you become involved in such an accident. And remember, if you are injured you can always rely on The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation Ė where a fair settlement is no accident.

DOís:
What To Do In Case Of An Industrial, Chemical Or Explosive Accident:

1. Seek legal advice as soon as you or a family member become the victim of negligence by a third party.

2. Learn your rights, and how the law protects you in the circumstance of your injury.

3. Identify witnesses to the accident (names, addresses and phone numbers).

4. When possible, photograph or videotape the surroundings, instrumentalities or things that caused or played a role in causing the accident.

5. Where appropriate, call the police or governmental authorities to investigate, and:
-Never be talked out of calling the authorities, because without a police, incident or investigative report, you may not be able to prove your case.
-Give the police or authorities your full cooperation and a full, accurate account of what happened. Never admit fault and never exaggerate!
-List for police or the authorities all symptoms of injury you may be feeling, no matter how slight.
-Try to listen to what the other persons involved in any way in the accident or incident tells police or the authorities about what happened.
-Ask the police or authorities about fault under law or regulations which apply to the accident or incident.
-Cooperate fully and completely with any request made by the authorities, and always be courteous.

6. If in pain, report your condition to any and all authorities involved in any investigation, and request an ambulance.

7. When the medics arrive, give them a full, accurate report of symptoms.
-Cooperate fully with their examination and treatment plan.

8. Never attempt to drive, operate heavy machinery or work at heights if you are dazed, injured or on strong medications.

9. Call a family member or friend to the scene of the accident or incident, to lend assistance and as a witness.
-If possible, ask them to bring a photo-camera or video-camera to record the scene.

10. Attempt to get names, phone numbers and addresses of any witnesses.
-Give this information to the investigating officer or governmental authority. Keep a copy.

11. If symptoms last several hours, go to your family doctor or emergency room.
-Report how the accident occurred and give a full, accurate account of symptoms, but never exaggerate.
-Submit as necessary to exams, x-rays and advice of the treating doctor. If recommended, or if symptoms continue, see a specialist.
-Follow your doctorís recommendations (to the letter).
-Donít be afraid to ask questions of your doctor, to help you understand your injuries and treatment.

12. Donít discuss your case with any unnecessary parties.
-Your spouse, your doctor and your insurance agent are necessary. You should tell your insurance agent only what is absolutely necessary to give him/her notice of the accident and injury.
-Insurance adjusters who want recorded statements are not necessary and you should never give such a statement.

13. Report the accident to your insurance company.
-Get a copy of the accident report for them, and check it for accuracy.
-If the report is inaccurate, call the investigating officer or governmental authority and question him on it. (You have a right to do this. Ask him to correct the report.)
-If you have applicable insurance coverage, insist that your company investigate the accident/injury, and appraise and/or repair any damage done to your property.
(They will be reimbursed by the other, responsible partyís insurance.)

14. If your injuries/symptoms persist for more than a few days, consult an attorney.
-Be sure the attorney is a personal injury specialist. Ask him about his experience!
-Write down all questions you may have about the accident prior to the interview.
-Learn all you can about your rights in such a legal case.
-Ask what fees and expenses you will be required to pay, what the attorney thinks the case should be valued at, and what he feels he can do for you in a recovery.
-Donít hesitate to interview several attorneys and compare their responses.

15. Get property damage estimates on any damaged equipment or property from the accident, if you have appropriate coverage to repair such damages. Give these estimates to your attorney or to the negligent partyís insurance company if you have no attorney.
-Try to get the identity of the responsible partyís insurance carrier and ask them to repair your damaged property.

16. Try to get the responsible partyís insurer to pay for your medical bills, without signing releases. (By doing so, the other driverĎs insurance company will be admitting fault.)

17. Never sign any releases until you are fully prepared to settle your case.
-The only exception is when your attorney advises you to do so, for a particular and important reason.

18. Keep a written daily diary of the aftermath of the accident.
-List all that happened in the accident and initial medical exams.
-Follow your progress and the problems caused in everyday life by your injuries.
(This will prove invaluable at your trial, which may be much later.)

19. You should never consider settling your case until all your symptoms have disappeared and you are back to normal.
-If you have had a concussion, you should not settle for six (6) months, at least.
-Remember: Your cause of action is the most important protection you have against a truly serious or catastrophic injury.

20. Obtain the following documentation for yourself and/or your attorney:
-Copies of all medical bills resulting from the accident.
-A list of which bills have been paid and which have not.
-A list of mileages to and from all healthcare providers.
-Copies of all doctorsí medical reports and dictations in your medical file.
-Copies of all admit and emergency room records of all hospitals treating you for the accident.
-Copies of radiology reports on tests given to you, such as x-rays, CT scans, MRIs or myelograms.
-Copies of all statements given by any witnesses to any aspect of the accident.
-Copies of your wage records or income tax returns to show the impact of the accident on your income.
-Any photographs or videotape of the injuries, accident scene, vehicles, equipment, property or any other aspect of the case.
-Copies of your insurance policies.
-Copies of property damage estimates on your vehicle.
-A copy of the accident report filed by the police or governmental authorities.

DON'Ts:
What Not To Do In Case Of An Industrial, Chemical Or Explosive Accident:

1. Donít be talked into not calling the police or governmental authorities.

2. Donít give recorded statements to insurance adjusters.

3. Donít sign releases or checks with release language printed on them.

4. Donít settle your case unless your symptoms are completely gone.

5. Donít settle your case unless you have spoken to an attorney and have had your rights explained to you and your questions answered.

6. Donít discuss any aspects of your case with unnecessary persons.

7. Donít do anything just because they say you "have toĒ


Medical Malpractice


If you feel that you or a family member have incurred needless pain, suffering or additional injury as the result of the carelessness or mistakes of a doctor, medical institution or other medical or psychological therapist or professional, then you may have a case for malpractice. Malpractice cases can be very complicated and tough to prove. Make sure you donít add to the complication by making mistakes early on.

The following list of Doís and Doníts can help ensure that you make the right decisions in such a situation. However, the best advice we can give you regarding Medical Malpractice is this: if you suspect that you or a family member have suffered as a result of insufficient, improper or inappropriate medical or psychological treatment, contact The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation immediately. We will put our winning team to work in getting you the settlement you deserve.

DOís:
What To Do In Case Of Medical Malpractice:

1. Seek legal advice as soon as you suspect you or a family member might be the victim of medical malpractice.

2. Insist on certified copies of all medical records relating to your treatment. Medical records are confidential but, as the patient, you have a right to all recordsóincluding charges.

3. Write a diary or ledger with notations on everything the doctor or medical facility and staff told you or instructed you to do.

4. Keep an accurate chronological record of when you first sought treatment, the names of any specialists you were referred to, outpatient care, etc.

5. Seek a second opinion from a qualified doctor but do not share your suspicions of malpractice with the second doctor.

6. Cease receiving care from the source that you suspect might be committing malpractice against you, unless that provider is in the midst of a complex treatment and it would be inappropriate or detrimental to make an immediate change.

7. Seek the advice and representation of an attorney who concentrates his/her practice in the area of medical malpractice, as very few attorneys are competent to handle these cases.

DON'Ts:
What Not To Do In Case Of Medical Malpractice:

1. Donít attempt to confront the doctor(s), medical staff, lawyers for the medical facility or anyone else regarding your suspicions until youíve spoken with your attorney.

2. Donít sign anything, waive any rights or admit to any responsibility.

3. Donít discuss your suspicions with any other person outside of your immediate family and with your attorney.

4. Donít continue receiving treatment from doctors or medical institutions that you suspect are perpetrating malpractice against you.

5. Donít tell medical personnel that you need medical records to bring to an attorney. Instead, tell them you need the records for insurance and/or social security purposes.


   

 

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