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Our History

Glenn Armentor founded his law corporation in 1977 with a mission to represent people who have been injured – but his life's work goes far beyond that. From its beginning, The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation has been based upon the principle of helping people who are truly in need – providing compassionate, caring assistance to those who deserve fair compensation for injuries or damages, regardless of their station in life.

This is of special importance because Glenn Armentor came from humble beginnings himself, and he has made an effort to "pay forward” the help he received from others in his early years by establishing a $10,000 scholarship to help underprivileged children attend college and attain their dreams.

With that said, it is no accident that The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation is located in historic Good Hope Hall in Lafayette, Louisiana. This building is located in a section of Lafayette that was known as "Freetown” just after the Civil War. This was a place where former slaves who were "free men of color” formed a subdivision among lower and middle class Caucasians – and all lived together.

In the late 19th century, a segment of the African American community in Freetown formed a benevolent group known as the "Good Hope Society,” which became leaders of their community. To commemorate the founding of their society, they built their meeting place, Good Hope Hall, in 1902 at its current location – the corner of Gordon and Stewart Streets in Lafayette.

Over the following years, Good Hope Hall served as a meeting hall and a place for wedding receptions, celebrations and religious worship – and eventually became a Catholic church at one point. In the roaring twenties and the depression of the 1930's, Good Hope Hall became one of the truly great jazz halls of America –– as all of the great jazz artists including Louie Armstrong and Fats Pinchon played there.

After World War II, Good Hope Hall became a Catholic church again – then served many purposes later including housing the USL Community Theatre, the Good Hope Printing Company and the Good Hope Cabinet & Carpentry Company.

In 1981, the structure was sold to a young Glenn Armentor and his partner to house their combined practice. Glenn soon bought out his partner and began building the practice that would become The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation.

Glenn has since expanded his corporation's facilities by adding an annex that was historically designed to match the original building in both materials and appearance. However, no matter how large the facility may grow, the original Good Hope Hall will remain the same in both appearance and spirit. And in the years to come, The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation and Good Hope Hall will always stand for justice and fair compensation for people in need.